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Prayer Shawl Ministry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





The Prayer Shawl Ministry is a service of AARTH Ministry that invites followers of Christ to share their spiritual gifts, natural talents and abilities to create shawls of compassion for others in need. The intent is to comfort and give solace to those who receive the shawl. It wraps the wearer in a warm tangible creation of God’s love.

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of compassion and the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves have received from God. 2 Corinthians 1:3, 4

Why is it called a prayer shawl?
As each shawl is being created, its maker is in prayer for the future recipient. The Shawl Ministry group often prays together for the recipients. A prayer may start by affirming the Lord’s love and mercy and go on to ask that He show mercy to, or give comfort to the receiver of the shawl. The group may ask for restored health or faith for the receiver. The prayers are heartfelt and specific to the receivers’ needs.


May your unfailing love rest upon us, O Lord, even as we put our hope in you. Psalms 33:22

Who makes prayer shawls?
If you love knitting or crocheting and have compassion for others, you may be a candidate for the Prayer Shawl Ministry. The ministry team is made up of dedicated people (not always just women) who get together to create shawls.


Who will get the shawl?

Each shawl is to be given to a person with a particular need. The need may be during a time of stress, serious illness or medical treatment, bereavement or at any time when comfort and prayer are needed. Some shawls are not created for a particular person. Instead, when a number of shawls are finished, they can be taken to shelters, hospitals, oncology centers, hospice or nursing homes. Shawls are housed at AARTH Ministry where they can be picked up when an immediate need is found.


Join a shawl knitting gathering
Come to knit or learn how to knit and crochet shawls to comfort those in need.

For time and location of prayer shawl gatherings contact AARTH Ministry at praiseprayershawl@aarth.org or (206) 850-2070.

Supplies for making a shawl
    3 Skeins of lion Brand Yarn
    Crochet hook size N or 9, 11 to 13 knitting needles
Approximate cost for supplies: $15.00

We welcome your financial donations and materials for making shawls.


For more information contact:
Karen Alexander
Prayer Shawl Ministry Director
AARTH Ministry
5237 Rainier Avenue S.; Seattle, WA 98118
206-850-2070; praiseprayershawl@aarth.org






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History of the Prayer Shawl

TALITH, TALIS, TALIT or Prayer Shawl is known by several names in Old and New Testament scriptures and was designed by the instructions of God. Num. 15:37-40

In biblical times  Jewish men wore the talith all the time, not just at prayer. TALITH contains two Hebrew words: Tal meaning tent and ith meaning little.  Little Tent. Each man had his own little tent.

Six million Jews could not fit into the meeting tent. Therefore, each had their own private sanctuary where they could meet with God. Each man had his own Prayer Shawl or TALIS. He would pull it up over his heads, forming a tent, where he would chant and sing Hebrew songs and call upon Elohom, YaWeh, Adonai. It was an intimate and  private time, set apart from anyone else, totally focused upon God. Matthew 6:6 tells us to enter into our "closet" for prayer. This was the prayer closet!

The Talith of the Old Testament Jewish custom continues unto this day, a symbol of God’s covering, protection, and healing, and our prayers, praise and worship from our earthen tent. In the New Testament it is the hem of Jesus’ garment as the woman with the issue of blood desperately reached out to touch the hem of his shawl. The Talith, also known as napkin, is found neatly folded and set aside in the tomb after the resurrection. The little tent of the Old Testament Talith was a shadow of our temple, the tent of the New Testament.


Now we know that if the earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, an eternal house in heaven,… 2 Cor. 5:1

And he said, "These are they who have come out of the great tribulation; they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb. Therefore, "they are before the throne of God and serve him day and night in his temple; and he who sits on the throne will spread his tent over them. Rev. 7:15

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